Suggestions when Feeding your Elderly Loved Ones

Alleviate any diversions when eating, and be basic with your
meals:
  •  Use only utensils that are needed.
  •  Have cups with lids to avoid a mess if spilled.
  •  If possible, use bowls instead of plates.
  •  Provide food that can easily be eaten. Serve
    food that is already cut, cooled, and easily          recognizable to the person.

Caring for those with swallowing or chewing problems:
  •  Use simple spoken commands to help them realize
    when to swallow and when to chew.
  •  Do not serve food that breaks apart easily or
    foods that tend to be messy.
  • Serve food in small amounts, and make sure food
    is cut up so they can chew and swallow without much effort.
  • Allow them a moment to swallow and then prepare
    for their next bite.
  • Check to see that food is not too hot for them,
    and have it moistened if possible.

Caring for those who eat too much or too little:
  • Allow for healthy snacks throughout the day to
    offset eating at just mealtime.
  •  Ensure the person receives enough exercise to
    justify their food intake.
  •  Serve foods that the person likes best to keep
    up their appetite.
  •  Think about your style of cooking. Does it
    supply the proper nutrition and is it easy to digest?

Source: www.caregiver.com/articles/general/eating_habits.htm

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.

How to Cope with Your Parents Aging

How do you cope
with your parents aging? It depends if you are ready for your parents aging and
if you are close enough to help with the issues of your parents aging. It also
depends on what age your parents are, what they are going through, and how much
financial help you are able to give.
Parents Aging Needs
How you cope
with your parents aging depends on your situation. Are your parents elderly and
have experience health/medical issues for some time? Or have your parents
health declined rapidly? That will decide how you cope with your parents aging.
It comes down to how you emotionally handle your aging parents to how you will
cope.
How do you cope with Your Parents
Aging Needs?
Your aging
parents will have care needs that sometimes you are not able to care for. That is
why nursing homes and agencies like us, Advanced Senior Solutions are able to
step in and help with nursing care. If you are also busy with working a
full-time job then you will be lacking in time, but you will still be able to
provide support in other ways.
If your
parent is no longer able to care for their day-to-day living needs then maybe
you will be able to organize an assessment team to enter the home and decide
what type of home care needs your parents qualify for.
What about
the fact that your parents are no longer able to be the parent figure? There
will be a stage in your life when you will become the parent and your parents
almost become the child. Are you ready for that stage of life? How do you cope
with your parents aging needs? You will need a good support system behind you,
offering you a shoulder to lean on so that your own health will be looked
after.
Parents Do Age
All parents
age. It is a matter of when, a matter of how, and a matter of how you will
cope. If you do your research and know what options are available then you will
be emotionally and physically ready for when your parents do age. Remember you
are only human and will need a break at times from the situation of your aging
parents, and need to look after yourself before you look after another person.
Resource:
www.seniorslist.com/inner.php?aid=4381

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.

Caregiver Burnout and Dementia

Patients with
dementia can be among the most challenging types of patients to care for. Even a person with the best intentions can get frustrated when the patient acts out or
refuses to cooperate. Just remember, the behaviors a person with dementia shows
are parts of the disease and not aimed at you personally.
·        
Stay
calm and be understanding. Raising your voice or showing signs of frustration
will only make the situation worse.
  •          Be
    patient and flexible. If the patient refuses to get in the shower, maybe a good
    bed bath will work for today and he/she can shower tomorrow. 
  •          Do
    not argue or try to convince the person. The patient cannot reason and may not
    be able to understand what is obvious to you. 
  •          Respond
    to patient’s requests as long as no harm will come. If the patient insists on
    wearing his/her shirt backwards that may be the way she wears it today.
  •      Take
    a moment to re-charge. If you feel your frustration and anxiety rising, ensure
    the patient is safe and walk away and take a few deep breaths before you
    return. This may be a good break for the patient too.

Patients with
dementia are at higher risk of elder abuse than other seniors. Educate all
members of the family regarding some of the signs and symptoms of potential
abuse, neglect and caregiver burnout. Some possible examples of abuse and neglect
may be:
·        
New
cuts or bruises.
  •          The
    patient showing fear towards their family members or professional caregivers.
  •          Finding
    the patient wet or soiled often.
  •          Always
    finding the patient wearing the same soiled clothing.
  •          Little
    or no food in the home or lack of prescribed medications.

Do not
automatically jump to conclusions, but don’t be afraid to ask questions.
Caregiver burnout and distress is common in family members of patients with
dementia, especially as the disease progresses. Family members should not
judge, but should be there to provide support and relief when needed. Assist in
identifying community resources before they are needed. A medical social worker
can often help with this process. Dementia is often a misunderstood disorder.
Good communication between all family members can go a long way to provide the
best possible care for the patient. Educate all members of the family regarding
the challenges that they may encounter, Coordinate visits between family
members so that the patient is not overwhelmed by too many visitors at one
time. Help family members to understand that the patient’s behavior may vary
from one day to the next so that they understand the changes.
Providing
care for a patient with dementia can be difficult and challenging at times.
These patients require extra understanding and patience. As the incidence of
people with dementia rises in the United States, it is important that we
understand the disease and how to care for people with the disease.
Source:
www.seniorslist.com/inner.php?aid=4251

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.

Alzheimer’s and Communication

Communication plays a big part in maintaining a
healthy outlook, for yourself and for sufferers of the disease. As it ravages
the mind, the sufferer begins having difficulty communicating and may show
signs of one of the following:
  •          Difficulty
    finding the right words.
  •          Familiar
    words might be used repeatedly.
  •       The
    person’s train of thought frequently gets lost.
  •        Difficulty
    in organizing thoughts and words in a logical fashion.
  •      Gestures
    might come into play more often, in place of words.
  •      Due
    to frustration and anger at being misunderstood, curse words may become more
    prevalent in dialog.
You might be
asking yourself, “Where do I come in?” When communicating with an Alzheimer’s
patient, here are a few tips that will ease the process and make your
connections more fruitful.
·         
  • Eye
    contact is important. It shows the person that you are listening and that you
    care about what is being said.
  • Mutual
    understanding is important. It does a world of good to let the person know you
    are trying to help them and understand what they have to say.
  •  Discussions
    with an Alzheimer’s patient are sometimes rambling, disjointed things. That’s
    okay. Be careful not to interrupt, or argue with them.
  •  When
    words fail, ask the person to gesture to what it is they want or need. Often
    they will recognize something visually, even if they can’t articulate what it
    is.
  •  Speak
    simply and plainly. Use short, concise words.
  •  Feelings,
    rather than facts are often greater importance to an Alzheimer’s patient. Try not
    to rely on logic to sway them or get them to understand you.
  • Conversation
    can be slow. Take your time, repeat things as necessary and try to be patient
    enough to wait when they have trouble ordering their thoughts.

Living as an
Alzheimer’s patient or as a caregiver of one is never easy, but with these
helpful hints and compassion, understanding and love, you can help make this
period in their lives a more peaceful one.

Source:
www.seniorslist.com/php?aid=4595

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.

6 Types of Normal Memory Loss

      1.   Absentmindedness
Where did you leave your keys? Or why
did you walk into the living room? Both of these are very common lapses that
usually stem from lack of attention or focus.
Memory
Tip:

Focus on what you are doing or thinking in any given moment, and you will stop
a lot of these lapses. If you find yourself in the middle of one, retracing
your steps, mentally or actually, can help.
      2.    
Blocking
This is the frustrating
tip-of-the-tongue moment. You know the word you are trying to say, but you
can’t quite retrieve it from memory.
Memory
Tip:

Review mentally or even write down the elements or facts of a story or event
before you talk about them. If you find yourself stuck in the moment, try to
remember other details about the event, name or place, which often will trigger
the memory you are searching for.
      3.    
Scrambling
This is when you accurately remember
most of an event or other chunk of information, but confuse certain key
details. Example: A friend tells you over dinner at a restaurant that she is
taking out a second mortgage on her home. Later, you recall the gist of her
news but think she told you during a phone conversation.
Memory
Tip:
Draw on mental cues from an experience or event to trigger
an accurate recollection. Focus on piecing together specific details of the
memory such as the time. Place, the people you saw, the reason for the event,
topics of conversation.
      4.    
Fade
Out
The brain is always sweeping out old
memories to make room for new ones, the more time that passes between an
experience and when you want to recall it, the more likely you are to have
forgotten much of it. So while it is typically fairly easy to remember what you
did over the past several hours, recalling the same events and activities a
month, or a year ago is more difficult. This is the basic “use-it-or-lose-it”
feature of memory known as transience is normal at all ages.
Memory
Tip:
Studies show that events we discuss, ponder over, record
or rehearse are recalled in the most detail and for longest periods of time. So
one of the best ways to remember events and experiences whether every day or
life changing is to talk or think about them.
      5.    
Retrieval
You were introduced to someone and
seconds later you can’t recall his/her name. Aging changes the strengths of the
connections between neurons in the brain. New information can bump out other
items from short-term memory unless it is used over and over again.
Memory
Tip:
This type of short-term memory loss can be avoided by
focusing in any given moment and eliminating distractions.
      6.    
Muddled
Multitasking
This is when the number of things you
can do effectively at one time diminishes. For example, maybe you can’t watch
the news and talk on the phone at the same time anymore.
Studies show that the older we get, the
more the brain has to exert effort to maintain focus. Further, it takes longer
to get back to an original task after an interruption.
Memory
Tip:
Avoid interruptions and concentrate on one task at a
time.  According to a 2009 Stanford
University study, this advice holds true at any age because most multitaskers
are not truly focused. “People who are regularly bombarded with several streams
of electronic information do not pay attention, control their memory or switch
from one job to another as well as those who prefer to complete one task at a
time,’ the researchers concluded.

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go
to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273.
We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much
more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in
pe

Vitamin E May Slow the Progression of Alzheimer’s

There isn’t a cure for Alzheimer’s or a drug that reverses the disease, but researchers have found a treatment to slow the disease that is simple, cheap, and safe.
Among more than 600 patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease, a daily high-dose of vitamin E slowed the decline in the ability of patients to perform everyday tasks such as dress or bathe independently by about 6 months.  And, those taking vitamin E needed two hours a day less help from caregivers.
The study, which appeared in the January 1 issue of JAMA, didn’t find any improvement in the memory or thinking ability of the patients. Those taking the Alzheimer’s medication memantine or a combination of vitamin E and mematine didn’t do any better than those taking a placebo.

Source: blog.aarp.org/2014/01/03/vitamin-e-may-slow-alzheimers-progression

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.

What is the treatment of a stroke?

Tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA)
There is
opportunity to use alteplase (tPA) as a clot-buster drug to dissolve the blood
clot that is causing the stroke. There is a narrow window of opportunity to use
this drug. The earlier that it is given, the better the result and the less
potential for the complication of bleeding into the brain.
Present
American Heart Association guidelines recommend that if used, tPA must be given
within 4 ½ hours after the onset of symptoms and ideally within 3 hours. For
patients who waken from sleep with symptoms of stroke, the clock starts when
they were last seen in a normal state.
tPA is
injected into a vein in the arm. The time frame for its use may be extended to
6 hours if it is dripped directly into the blood vessel (intra-arterial) that
is blocked requiring angiography. Not all hospitals have access to this
technology. It had been hoped that using the same technique, the clot could be
identified and removed by suction. Unfortunately, studies show that patient
outcomes were not improved compared with tPA therapy.
tPA may
reverse stroke symptoms in more than one-third of patients, but may also cause
bleeding in 6% of patients, potentially making the stroke worse.
For strokes
involving the cerebellum of the brain and involving the vertebroasilar circulation,
the time frame for treatment with tPA potentially may be extended even further
to 18 hours.
Heparin and aspirin
Drugs to thin
the blood are also sometimes used in treating stroke patients in the hopes of
improving the patient’s recovery. It is unclear, however, whether the use of
anticoagulation improves the outcome from the current stroke or simply helps to
prevent subsequent strokes. In certain patients, aspirin given after the onset
of a stroke does have a small, but measurable effect on recovery. The treating
doctor will determine the medications to be used based upon a patient’s specific
needs.
Managing other medical problems
Blood
pressure will be tightly controlled often using intravenous medication to prevent
stroke symptoms from progressing. This is true whether the stroke is ischemic or
hemorrhagic.

Supplemental
oxygen is often provided.
In patients
with diabetes, the blood sugar (glucose) level is often elevated after a
stroke. Controlling the glucose level in these patients may minimize the size
of a stroke.

Patients who
have suffered a transient ischemic attack may be discharged with blood pressure
and cholesterol medications even of the blood pressure and cholesterol levels
are within acceptable levels. Smoking cessation is mandatory.
Rehabilitation
When a
patient is no longer acutely ill after a stroke, the health care staff focuses
on maximizing the individual’s functional abilities. This is most often done in
an inpatient rehabilitation hospital or in a special area of a general
hospital. Rehabilitation can also take place at a nursing facility.
The
rehabilitation process can include some or all of the following:
1.   
Speech
therapy to relearn talking and swallowing.
2.   
Occupational
therapy to regain as much function and dexterity in the arms and hands as
possible.
3.   
Physical
therapy to improve strength and walking.
4.   
Family
education to orient them in caring for their loved one at home and the
challenges they will face.
The goal is
for the patient to resume as many, if not all, their pre-stroke activities and
functions. Since a stroke involves the permanent loss of brain cells, a total
return to the patient’s pre-stroke status is not necessarily a realistic goal
in many cases. However, many stroke patients can return to vibrant independent
lives.
Depending
upon the severity of the stroke, some patients are transferred from the
rehabilitation hospital setting to a skilled nursing facility to be monitored
and continue physical and occupational therapy.
Many times,
home health workers can assess the home living situation and make
recommendations to ease the transition home. Unfortunately, some stroke
patients have such significant nursing needs that they cannot be met by
relatives and friends. Long-term nursing care may be required.

Source:www.onhealth,com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=174161

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.