What is a Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)?

A transient
ischemic attack (TIA, mini-stroke) is a short lived stroke that gets better and
resolves.  It is a short-lived episode
(less than 24 hours) of temporary impairment of brain function that is caused
by a loss of blood supply. A TIA causes a loss of function in the area of the
body that is controlled by the portion of the brain affected. The loss of blood
supply to the brain is most often caused by a clot that spontaneously forms in
a blood vessel within the brain (thrombosis). However, it can also result from
a clot that forms elsewhere in the body, dislodges from that location, and
travels to lodge in an artery of the brain (emboli). Arterial spasm and,
rarely, a bleed into brain tissue are other causes of TIA. Many people refer to
a TIA as a “mini-stroke.”
Some TIAs
develop slowly, while others develop rapidly. By definition, all TIAs resolve
within 24 hours. Strokes take longer to resolve than TIAs, and with strokes,
complete function may never return and reflect a more permanent and serious
problem. Although most TIAs often last only a few minutes, all TIAs should be
evaluated with the same urgency as a stroke in an effort to prevent recurrences
and/or strokes, TIAs can occur once, multiple times, or preceded a permanent stroke.
 A
transient ischemic attack should be considered an emergency because there is no
guarantee that the situation will resolve itself and function will return spontaneously
without help of a medical intervention.

A TIA from a
clot in the blood vessel that supplies the retina of the eye can cause
temporary visual loss, which is often described as the sensation of a black,
dark curtain coming down. A TIA that involves the carotid artery can produce problems
with movement or sensation on one side of the body, which is the side opposite
to the actual blockage; one-sided weakness or complete paralysis of the arm,
leg, face, or one whole side of the body; or be unable to speak or understand
commands.

Source:
www.onhealth.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=174161

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.

What is a Stroke and the Risk Factors?

Brain cell function
requires a constant delivery of oxygen and glucose from the bloodstream. A
stroke occurs when blood supply to part of the brain is disrupted, leading to
inadequate oxygen supply and causing brain cells to die. Blood flow can be
compromised in a variety of ways. Stroke is also referred to as cerebrovascular
accident (CVA).
Blockage of an artery
·        
Narrowing
of small arteries within the brain can cause a lacunar stroke (lacune means “empty
space”). Blockage of a single arteriole can affect a tiny area of brain causing
that tissue to die.
·        
Hardening
of the arteries (atherosclerosis) leading to the brain. There are four major blood
vessels that supply the brain with blood. The
amterior circulation
of the brain’s two cerebral cortices controls most
motor activity, sensation, thought, speech, and emotion is supplied by the two carotid
arteries. The posterior circulation,
which supplies the brain stem and the cerebellum, controlling the automatic
parts of the brain function and coordination, is supplied by the two
vertebroasilar arteries.
If these main
arteries become narrowed as a result of atherosclerosis, plaque or cholesterol
debris can break off and float downstream, clogging the blood supply to a part
of the brain. As opposed to lacunar strokes, larger parts of the brain can lose
blood supply, and this may produce more symptoms, with loss of brain function,
more than seen with a lacunar stroke.
·        
Embolism to the brain from the heart. In some instances a thrombus or blood
clot can form within the heart and the potential exists for them to break off and
travel (embolize) to the arteries in the brain and cause a stroke. Atrial fibrillation,
an irregular heart rhythm, is the most common cause of thrombus formation.
·        
Cerebral hemorrhage (bleeding within the brain structure).
The most common reason to have bleeding within the brain is uncontrolled high
blood pressure. Other situations include aneurysms that leak or rupture or
arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in which there is an abnormal collection of
blood vessels that are fragile and can bleed.
What are the risk factors for stroke?
Overall, the
most common risk factors for stroke are:
·        
High
blood pressure
·        
High
cholesterol
·        
Smoking
·        
Diabetes
·        
Increasing
age
When stroke
occurs in younger individuals (less than 50 years old), less common risk
factors to be considered include illicit drugs, ruptured aneurysms, and
inherited predisposition to abnormal blood clotting.
An example of
a genetic predisposition to stroke occurs in a rare condition called
homocystinuria, in which there are excessive levels of the chemical homocystine
in the body. Scientists are trying to determine whether the non-hereditary occurrence
of high levels of homocystine at any age can predispose to stroke.
Source:
www.onhealth.com/script/main.art.asp?articlekey=174161

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.

Stroke Facts

·        
Stroke
is the sudden death of brain cells due to lack of oxygen.
·        
Stroke
is caused by blockage of blood flow of an artery to or in the brain.
·        
Sudden
tingling, weakness, or paralysis on one side of the body or difficulty with
balance, speaking, swallowing, or vision can be a symptom of a stroke.
·        
Any
person suspected of having a stroke or TIA should present for emergency care
immediately.
·        
Clot-busting
drugs like tPA can be used to reverse a stroke, but the time frame for their
use is very narrow. Patients need to be present for care as soon as possible so
that tPA therapy can be considered.
·        
Surgical
treatments are used infrequently under special circumstances.
·        
Stroke
prevention involves minimizing risk factors, such as controlling high blood
pressure, elevated cholesterol, tobacco abuse, and diabetes.

Source:
www.onhealth.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=174161

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.

What is Hospice Care and Why is it Important?

What is Hospice Care?
Hospice is a
field of medicine that focuses on the comprehensive care of patients with
terminal illnesses. Hospice is not a place but rather a service that offers
support, resources, and assistance to terminally ill patients and their
families.
The main goal
of hospice is to provide a peaceful, symptom-free, and dignified transition to
death for patients whose diseases are advanced beyond a cure. The hope for a
cure shifts to hope for a life free of suffering. The focus becomes quality of
life rather than its length.
Hospice care
is patient-centered medical care. A host of valuable services are offered to
address every aspect of the patient’s care as a whole. This is achieved by
considering each individual’s goals, values, beliefs, and rituals.
Why is Hospice Care Important?
In many
chronic and progressive conditions such as cancer, heart disease, or dementia,
the natural disease process can ultimately reach an end stage. Most of the
time, as a disease progresses to an advanced stage; its symptoms become more
intolerable and difficult to control. As a result, an end-stage condition can
significantly impair a person’s functional status and quality of life.
At this
point, often there is no further cure or treatment to control the progression
of the disease. Furthermore, aggressive treatment may only offer little benefit
while posing significant risk and jeopardizing the patient’s quality of life.
In such late
stages of diseases, especially when there is “nothing left to do,” hospice can
offer help for patients and families. There are many aspects of a patient’s
well-being that can be addressed. Hospice can play a key role in managing
physical symptoms of a disease (palliative care) and supporting patients and
families emotionally and spiritually.
Hospice care
promotes open discussions about “the big picture” with patients and their loved
ones. The disease process, prognosis, and realities are often important parts
of these discussions. More importantly, the patient’s wishes, values, and
beliefs are taken into account and become cornerstone of the hospice plan of
care.
Hospice and
palliative-care philosophy encourages these type of discussions with treating
physicians early on in the course of a terminal disease. Patients can outline
their preferences before they become too ill and incapable, thereby relieving
some of the decision making burden from family members.
Source: www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=147894

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.

Hospice Facts

·        
Hospice
is a service, not a physical place.
·        
Hospice
does not hasten or prolong death.
·        
Hospice
may be recommended for patients in the late stages of a terminal illness.
·        
The
goal of hospice is to provide comfort, reduce suffering, and preserve patient
dignity.
·        
A
team consisting of doctors, nurses, social workers, clerics, volunteers, and
therapists participate in the care of hospice patients.
·        
Medicare,
Medicaid, and most private insurance carriers provide hospice benefits.

Source:
www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=147894

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.

9 Natural Flu-Fighting Foods

1.       Black-Eyed
Peas
These
nutritious legumes are rich in zinc, a trace mineral that keeps your immune
system in working order. Pinto beans, peanuts, roasted pumpkin seeds and wheat
germ are other good choices.
2.       Carrots
They’re
rich in beta-carotene, which your body uses to ward off respiratory infections.
Other good sources are dark green vegetables, sweet potatoes, pumpkin and
winter squash.
3.       Tea
Green,
black and oolong tea all contain naturally occurring compounds that reduce the
risk of flu, including quercetin, a powerful antioxidant, and L-theanine, an
amino acid found only in tea. Decaf teas contain the amino acid, herbal teas
don’t.
4.       Yogurt
Probiotics,
the beneficial bacteria found in yogurt and other fermented foods, strengthen
the immune system. Not a fan of yogurt? Try cottage cheese, kimchi (a fermented
Korean dish made of seasoned vegetables) or sauerkraut instead.
5.       Tomatoes
Vitamin
C-rich tomatoes boost the body’s natural defense system in the same way their
citrusy relatives do. One medium tomato provides 40 percent of your daily
vitamin C, so have a glass of tomato juice at lunch and treat yourself to pasta
with tomato sauce for dinner.
6.       Mushrooms
These
powerhouses increase the body’s resistance to viral infections by boosting the
activity of natural killer cells, a vital part of the immune system. Mushrooms
are rich in selenium, low levels of which can increase the risk of developing a
severe flu.
7.       Almonds
These
popular nuts are a rich source of the antioxidant vitamin E, which helps your
body ward off viral infections. To maximize the absorption of vitamin E, opt
for chopped almonds, almond butter or almond oil.
8.       Chicken
Soup
It may
not prevent the flu, but a bowl or cup of soup can help your immune system
fight off the virus in its early stages, thanks to a compound called carnosine.
The only catch: You need to consume chicken soup throughout your illness to
reap its benefit, says a 2012 study.
9.       Wild
Salmon
It’s
high in vitamin D, which the immune system needs to kill harmful bacteria and
viruses, says John S. Adams, M.D., professor at the David Geffen School of
Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. Farm-raised salmon has
less, but is also a good source.

Source: http://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-09-2013/flu-fighting-foods-photos.html

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.

10 Facts on Dementia

1.     Dementia is not a normal part of aging.
Although
dementia mainly affects older people, it is not a normal part of aging.
Dementia is a syndrome, usually of a chronic or progressive nature, caused by a
variety of brain illnesses that affect memory, thinking, behavior and ability
to perform everyday activities.
2.     35.6 million people live with Dementia
The
total number of people with dementia worldwide in 2010 is estimated at 35.6
million. Among them, 58% live in low- and middle-income countries, and this
proportion is projected to rise to 71% by 2050.
3.     A new case of Dementia is diagnosed every 4
seconds
The
total number of new cases of dementia each year worldwide is nearly 7.7
million, implying one new case every four seconds. The number of people with
dementia is expected to nearly double every 20 years, to 65.7 million in 2030
and 115.4 million in 2050.
4.     Huge economic impact; US $604 billion per year
The
high cost of the disease will challenge health systems to deal with the
predicted future increase of cases. The costs are estimated at US$ 604 billion
per year at present and are set to increase even more quickly than the
prevalence.
5.     Caregivers of Dementia patients experience
high strain
Caring
for dementia patients is overwhelming for caregivers. The stresses include
physical, emotional and economic pressures. Caregivers require support from
the health, social, financial and legal systems.
6.     Early diagnosis improves the quality of life
of people with Dementia and their families
The principal goals for dementia care are:
  • diagnosing cases early.
  • optimizing physical health,
    cognition, activity and well-being.
  • detecting and treating behavioral
    and psychological symptoms.
  • providing information and
    long-term support to caregivers.
7.    
People with Dementia and
their families are often discriminated against
People with dementia are frequently denied the basic rights
and freedoms available to others. For example, physical and chemical restraints
are used extensively in aged-care facilities and acute-care settings.
8.    
Awareness and advocacy are needed
Improving the awareness and understanding of dementia
across all levels of society is needed to decrease discrimination and to
improve the quality of life for people with dementia and their caregivers.
9.    
More research and evaluation is required
More research is needed to develop new and more effective
treatments and to better understand the causes of dementia. Research that
identifies the modifiable risk factors of dementia is still scarce.
10.  Dementia is a public health priority
To address this important health priority there are actions that
can be taken:
  • promote a dementia friendly
    society.
  • make dementia a public health
    and social care priority everywhere.
  • improve attitudes to, and
    understanding of dementia.
  • invest in health and social
    systems to improve care and services for people with dementia and their
    caregivers.
  • increase research on dementia.

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.

5 Ways to Fight against Breast Cancer

Almost a quarter of a million women will be diagnosed with breast
cancer this year. And while early detection and more effective treatments have
dramatically reduced the number of those who will die from the disease,
researchers are still searching for ways to prevent it altogether.
Here is the latest cutting-edge thinking from researchers.
1.       Get enough sleep
Postmenopausal women with breast cancer who
routinely sleep less than six hours a night may be twice as likely to have more
aggressive breast cancers compared with those who sleep longer hours, a new
study has found.
“Cancer is a disease of mistakes in our DNA.
Sufficient sleep is responsible for maintaining our circadian rhythm, which
regulates our body’s natural DNA repair. If that process is frequently
disrupted, so is DNA correction,” explains lead author Cheryl Thompson, Ph.D.,
of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.
2.       Lose weight
While the link between obesity and breast
cancer is well-known, a recent study finds that just being overweight, but not
obese, can also be detrimental for those who have already been diagnosed. The
study of more than 4,000 women shows that being obese raised a woman’s risk of
recurrence by 30% and her risk of death by 50%, despite optimal treatments such
as chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. And the risk of recurrence also increased
with increasing BMI, even in women in the overweight range. The results
pertained to women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, the most
common type, which accounts for about 65% of cases.
“Breast cancer is linked to increased
levels of estrogen, and fat tissue produces excess amounts of it,” says lead
author Joseph A. Sparano, M.D, of Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, NY.
3.       Eat more cabbage
 A recent study conducted at the Harvard
School of Public Health found that women who ate about four servings of vegetables
a day minimized their chances of developing hormone receptor-negative breast
cancer by 18%.
Other research presented at the American
Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting on April 2012 revealed that
women with breast cancer who ate the highest amount of cruciferous vegetables
per day had a 62% reduced risk of breast cancer mortality and a 35% reduced
risk of recurrence.
“Cruciferous vegetables, such as
cauliflower, cabbage, bok choy, turnip greens, and broccoli contain high amounts
of isothiocyanates and indoles, phytochemicals that appear to have a protective
effect against some types of cancer,” says researcher Seingyoun Jung, ScD, of
Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.”
4.       Drink alcohol sparingly
That would be no more than one drink per
day, according to the American Cancer Society guidelines on nutrition and
physical activity for cancer prevention. One analysis of more than 40 studies
found that just two drinks a day may raise your odds by 21%. If you already
have the disease, one recent study showed that regular alcohol consumption
(half a drink or more per day) increased recurrence in postmenopausal women by
19%.
“A possible reason is that alcohol consumption
has been shown to elevate circulating estrogen levels in postmenopausal women,”
says lead author Marilyn Kwan, PhD, a research scientist at Kaiser Permanente
Northern California in Oakland. “ If you are breast cancer survivor,  talk to your doctor and consider limiting
your intake to no more than a half drink per day or no more than three to four
drinks per week,” says Kwan.
5.       Get up and go!
Walk. Garden. Vacuum. The latest research
shows that any physical activity protects against breast cancer. And news that
tops that: It is never too late to start. A new study finds that even women who
didn’t start exercising until after menopause showed diminished risk.
“This is particularly encouraging given the
late age of onset for the disease,” says study author Lauren McCullough, of the
University of North Carolina. Women who exercised at any intensity for 10 to 19
hours per week reaped the greatest benefit; they had about 30% reduced risk. That
breaks down to about 90 minutes a day, which seems like a lot, until you
realize that all activity counts.
Source:
www.aarp.prg/health/conditions-treatments/info-10-2013/breast-cancer-prevention.html

To reach one of our Advanced Senior Solution’s team members, either go to the Contact Us tab or call 727-443-2273. We’re here to help with all of your elder care questions, care needs, and much more! Call us today for a free no-obligation care consultation via phone or in person.